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Local Culture project

  • CA BMUFA 0003
  • Collection
  • 2003-2005

The goal of the Local Culture and Diversity on the Prairies project was to document everyday life, ethno-cultural identity and regional variation among people of Ukrainian, French, German and English heritage. How did people from diverse backgrounds interact, adapt and become "prairie Canadians" in the first half of the twentieth century? What was the relationship between cultural inheritance and local community participation? How did they express their various identities on the local community level? The project was designed to generate a great deal of documentary information and primary resources for further research in many aspects of these people's lives.

The collection consists of some 800 hours of audio recordings documenting life in approximately 450 different locations on the Prairies and across Canada prior to 1939, as well as video recordings, photographs, documents, field notes and other material associated with the project.

Kule Folklore Centre

Lorilee Chomik folklore collection

  • CA BMUFA 0159
  • Collection
  • 1982

Course paper Ukr. 326. Date on the paper April 7, 1982. Instructor Dr. P. A. Rolland

Chomik, Lorilee

Lubomyr Romankiw Plast collection

  • CA BMUFA 0018
  • Collection
  • May 30, 2015

The collection consist of a photograph and audio recording of the talk Lubomyr Romankiw gave for the Edmonton Plast parents during annual Sviato Vesny (Spring Celebration) organized by Edmonton Plast at the Elk Island National Park in East Central Alberta on May 30, 2015. Dr. Romankiw speaks about Plast, its creation, and activities in the past and today in Ukraine and diaspora communities around the world.

Romankiw, Lubomyr

Lys Mykyta collection

  • CA BMUFA 0096
  • Collection
  • 1966-1982

The collection consists of 147 issues of the satirical and humour magazine "Lys Mykyta" published in Detroit by Edward Kozak. He started publishing it in 1948, after he emigrated to Germany after the WWII. In 1949 he settled in the United States, and resumed publishing Lys Mykyta in 1951.

Kozak, Edward

Maidan on Facebook

  • CA BMUFA 0040
  • Collection
  • 2014-01-19 - 2016-01-26

The project consists of the materials collected for Nataliya Bezborodova's master thesis. The thesis traces Internet textual representations of the Maidan, a wide-scale protest movement that took place in 2013-2014 in Ukraine, and their function in identifying the opposing sides during the protests. These texts helped to formulate new narratives, articulate attitudes, and build relationships, create a sense of community within the protestors’ side, which had its impact on institutional changes of commemorative practices.

Facebook served as an important platform for the initial appeal, for coordination between the participants, for reflections, and for identification of the opposing sides during the protests. It was a key space for sharing emotions, personal stories, humor and expressive forms of protest, making allusions to known literary works, historical events and world public figures.

Exploring the types of narratives and their contribution in identifying the opposing sides, the work is focused on digital stories that illuminate elements not covered by the professional media coverage and official reports. It traces the diverse forms, topics and expressive devices in the narratives, and identifies the categories of lore (eyewitness narratives, (re)telling of stories, jokes, poetry, songs, etc.). It provides juxtaposition of the patterns found in the text with the main events of each specific day.

The thesis provides several chapters that focus on: (1) a review of the historical context of the events; (2) an analysis of the data with reference to all categories and topics, and the main findings; (3) the role of humor and expressive devices in releasing the tension of the conflict and in helping to formulate the attitudes within the protestors’ side; (4) evidence of the functions of personal stories as they build relationships, create a sense of community, and validate the participants’ experiences and the significance of the events from the protestors’ perspectives; (5) interpretation within this protest lore, and its impact on institutional changes of commemorative practices as in the example of the Nebesna Sotnia (Heavenly Hundred) narrative formation and its correlation to the repertoire of motifs and terms of the selected historical periods: the Cossack, the Ukrainian National Republic and World War II.
The study underlines the relevance of time and several patterns related to historical events, as Facebook posts immediately responded to the events occurring on the square and streets occupied by protestors, simultaneously with professional media outlets, and sometimes prior to them. These findings have important implications that go beyond the Ukrainian context in that they contribute to the further exploration of social networks functioning in relation to factual events.

Bezborodova, Nataliya

Malanka at the University of Alberta

  • CA BMUFA 0004
  • Collection
  • 1973 - 1993

The Faculty Club Malanka collection features memorabilia from the annual Malanka that took place at the University of Alberta Faculty Club between January 13, 1973 and January 1993. Included in the collection are masks, programs and other ephemera related to the festivities. There are 20 masks worn by mummers for Malanka ’89. The masks were designed and created in December of 1988 by Meron Sembaliuk with the assistance of his father Paul Sembaliuk. Each mask was handmade, either with papier-mâché or from articles found around the home. Meron organized a group of his friends to take on the various characters associated with the event. Included were: Mark Ferbey (Malanka), Ihor Hlushok (Sun God), Vasyl Maluzynsky (Vasyl/soldier), Shannon Hohol (soldier), and Terry Taciuk (thief). Other characters included: a Bear, a Goat, a Gypsy, a Star, an Old Man, a Bird.

There is also a letter from Dr. Manoly Lupul addressed to the Faculty Club administration outlining menu requirements, plus program menus which were designed and printed by Larisa Sembaliuk Cheladyn. Decorations for the event included unique rushnyky (ritual towels) that were designed and created by Paul Sembaliuk with the assistance of his wife Pat Sembaliuk, and his children Larisa and her husband Mich, sons Philip, Meron, Yuri and youngest daughter Andrea. This collection has the rushnyk specifically worn by Roman Onufrijchuk, the master of ceremonies for Malanka ’77.

The first Malanka at the Faculty Club was hosted by Dr. Metro Gulutsan. In the years that followed MC’s were invited from within the Edmonton Ukrainian Community and beyond including: Roman Onufrijchuk and Myroslav Kohut.

Sembaliuk family

Marijka Kopan ethnographic collection

  • CA BMUFA 0144
  • Collection
  • 1982-1984

This collection includes essays on Ukrainian customs in Canada, korovai as a folk art, and the Ukrainian Museum of Canada. Also included is an article review.

Kopan, Marijka

Markian Kowaliuk ethnographic collection

  • CA BMUFA 0108
  • Collection
  • 1980

The collection consists of a fieldwork project and final papers done by Markian Kowaliuk for the Ukrainian Folklore courses at the University of Alberta.

Kowaliuk, Markian

Maryna Hrymych Brazil collection

  • CA BMUFA 0030
  • Collection
  • 2009

Maryna Hrymych was part of the team of four scholars who went to Brazil in May 2009 together with Andriy Nahachewsky, Serge Cipko and John Lehr. The goal of this research trip was to explore history, daily life, cultural landscape and traditional culture of Ukrainians in Brazil. Ukrainians started immigrating to Brazil in the end of the 19th century and settled mostly in the states of Parana and Santa Catarina. After the trip, all four researchers donated their photographs to the Bohdan Medwidsky Ukrainian Folklore Archives.

Hrymych, Maryna

Monica Jensen Ethnographic collection

  • CA BMUFA 0224
  • Collection
  • 1999-2005

The collection consists of assignments for various folklore classes at the University of Alberta including Ukrainian Material Culture (UKR-527), Ukrainian Folk Art and Performance (UKR-528), Rites of Passage (UKR-525), Ukrainian Calendar Customs (UKR-526), Ukrainian Folk Songs (UKR-522), Ukrainian Folk Prose (UKR-523), and Ukrainian Folklore in Canada (UKR-532).

The collection includes the following projects:

  • Poias for the Babies
  • Bunica's Funeral Dinner: The China
  • A Kuzhil' [Distaff] Among Flowers
  • "Yuriy Fedkowych Ukrainian Educational Society of Soda Lake" Proscenium Screen
  • Ukrainian Rites of Passage: Silence and Pregnancy
  • Iordan, Feast of the Epiphany
  • Katie and Christine: Their Kolomyiky
  • Wolves and Viagra: Katie and Metro
  • Literary Folkloristics and the Personal Narrative by Sandra Dolby Stahl: A Review of the Study
  • On Forgetting

Recollections of Ropchan (Rapchan) brothers, as well as indexes and transcripts of interviews conducted by Monica for her dissertation are also part of this collection.

Jensen, Monica

Myeong Jae Lee photograph collection

  • CA BMUFA 0120
  • Collection
  • 2006

The collection consists of photographs of Ukraine and its people taken by Myeong Lee in 2006 in Ukraine. The images depict calendar customs, rituals, and everyday life of Ukrainians.

Lee, Myeong Jae

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