Showing 158 results

Archival description
churches
Advanced search options
Print preview View:

151 results with digital objects Show results with digital objects

Porayko-Kyforuk family collection

  • CA BMUFA 0002
  • Collection
  • 1895-1980s

Collection consists of correspondence, memoirs, diaries, school reports, financial documents, photographs, research notes of Sophia Kyforuk and Octavia Hall.

Kyforuk family

Interview with Mr. and Mrs. Sommer

This item contains an interview conducted with Mr. and Mrs. Sommer. Mrs. and Mr. Sommer are talking about the farm life and their lack of money until the end of the 1930s. They bought their farm taking out a loan with the help of his brother and it paid back step by step. It was a difficult time for them. Their children learned English quickly at school, but Mrs. Sommer mentions that she did
not have any lessons, and could only learn English by herself which took some time. Children went to a German school. Later the children and grandchildren were able to speak English better than German. Mr. and Mrs. Sommer say that they did not had any problems during their journey to Canada because of being Germans.
Mr. and Mrs. Sommer talk about going to church (Lutheran Church, later Protestant). Sermon was preached by a teacher because the German pastor came only once in six weeks.
They came to Edmonton in 1957. Mrs Sommer compares life in Russia with their life in Canada and says that they needed about five years to feel at home in Canada. Later they learned to enjoy their freedom and didn’t want to get back again. They became
Canadian after a few years living in Canada.
Mrs. Sommer talks about speaking German and learning English language. German remained her main language. Mrs. Sommer says that she still cooks the way she learned it in Russia (sauerkraut and borscht).
Mr. Sommer has one sister living in Germany and they have many grandchildren living in Canada.

Sommer, Mr.

Interview with Mrs. Emma Gauss, a German from Russia

This item contains an interview with Mrs. Gauss, who was born in 1898, her maiden name was Zeider (Cyder?). Her mother originally
came from Württemberg. Her family was working on the land, were not rich. There were the only Germans in their village besides one shepherd. There was also a Lutheran church and a German school (education lasted 7 years). Children started going to school when they became seven years old. At the age of fifteen there usually was a confirmation and then they were working for their father until they got married and created own family. Her village was in the Melitopol district and there was a school in Eichenfeld. In general there were 32 family entities in the village each of them were farming and producing goods. Collectivization started in 1917-1918. The relationship with Russian people was good. There usually were many seasonal Russian workers in the German village. German children learned German and Russian languages in the school. Most of the Russian language they learned from Russian workers. Not many girls extended their school education as mothers needed them at home for help. There were eight children in her family, some families had ten, some six. Russians usually were very poor, had many children and not much land. Pomeschiki had more land. Mrs Gauss remembers how people once all together bought land from pomeschik and created a village. Germans were forced to go to the Russian army as well. Tsar Nicolai was loved by Germans. There was a school which educated doctors as well. She was 16 years old when the war started, Germans were forced to join the Russian army, many were captured in Germany and afterwards returned back to Russia. Her village didn´t have problems during the war, they had a cooperative and the living was good. She visited Krym once many years later. Memories on her village during the revolution. People came from Moscow, took what they wanted and went further to other villages.

Gauss, Emma

Band Music

This item contains two interviews with unknown females. The first interviewee was born in Russia in 1909. She talks about the place where she lived and family members that were starving and being deported to Siberia. She then talks about coming to Canada and what she and her husband did in Canada. She talks about the church and being Lutheran and Evangelic.

The second interviewee's parents came from Poland and she was raised in a Lutheran family. Her family left to Ukraine and then came to Canada in 1927 and moved to Alberta in 1928.

The tape also contains music recordings

Andriy Nahachewsky Brazil collection

  • CA BMUFA 0045
  • Collection
  • 2009-2010

Andriy Nahachewsky travelled to Brazil for 6 months (Nov 2009 – May 2010), and worked intensively to document the traditional culture of the Ukrainian community there (some 400,000 people, rural and urban). He visited some 40 communities with a significant Ukrainian population in the states of Parana, Sao Paulo and Santa Catarina. He recorded over 250 interviews, took approximately 12,000 photographs and recorded 53 hours of video recordings. He collected a small number of artifacts of traditional life, and amassed a library of approximately 200 books (either hard copy or electronically as pdf). Research methods included audience/participation, unstructured, and semi-structured interviews, as well as work in personal and institutional archives.

Since this was the first substantial ethnographic/folkloristic documentation of this community, Andriy cast the project’s mandate quite broadly, collecting diachronic and synchronic information on material culture (farming practices, foodlore, traditional crafts, folk architecture, religious painting), as well as oral traditions (dialectal speech, songs, legends, personal experience narratives), customary lore (particularly weddings, Christmas, Easter and other calendar holidays), spiritual culture (formal religion as well as folk beliefs, folk medicine, etc), performing arts (music and dance) and local history. In all cases, he was interested in continuity from the European heritage, but also particularly in hybridity and change in the community’s traditions.

The main goal of the project was to collect materials to write a book comparing Ukrainian traditional culture on three continents. People from western Ukraine emigrated to both Canada and Brazil from the same villages (mostly from the province of Galicia in what was then the Austro-Hungarian Empire), at the same time (largest wave of migration from 1891 until 1914), and for the same reasons (scarcity of farmland in Galicia, while Canada and Brazil were both hoping to settle newly opened agricultural territories quickly).

The traditions of the community in Brazil are rich and conceptually interesting. They are similar to Canadian traditions in many ways, but also quite different. The data raise numerous issues in ethnic symbolism, cultural continuity, and the relationship between traditions and their environment. Key strengths in the data relate to wedding traditions, personal history narratives, ethnic dance traditions, religious art, and calendar customs. There is good new information on regional diversity within the Ukrainian communities in Brazil.

Nahachewsky, Andriy

Orest Semchishen photograph collection

  • CA BMUFA 0001
  • Collection
  • 1970s - 1980s

Collection consists of photographs depicting Byzantine rite churches in rural Alberta.

Semchishen, Orest

Frank Fingarsen ethnographic collection

  • CA BMUFA 0102
  • Collection
  • 1984

The collection consists of essays and supporting material collected by Frank Fingarsen while taking Ukrainian Folklore courses at the University of Alberta.

Fingarsen, Frank

In the church

Inside the wooden church. A woman is standing with the candle and reading from the book. Three women are sitting by the wall. The women are wearing traditional khustky with kytytsi.

Aspects of change

The essay discusses cultural change on the example of Ukrainian Orthodox church. He compares prescribed church canon with what exists in the chapel in St. John's Institute looking specifically at the layout of the building, the placement of religious objects and the placement of pictures and icons in the chapel. Written for the course Ukrainian 326.

Ordination of f. Malinowsky

Ceremony of f. Malinowsky's ordination held in Ascension of Our Lady Church, the church of the village he was born and grow up in. The end of the ceremony. Ritual gestures. (Clergy clothing)

Ordination of f. Malinowsky

Ceremony of f. Malinowsky's ordination held in Ascension of Our Lady Church, the church of the village he was born and grow up in. The end of the ceremony. Ritual gestures. (Clergy clothing)

Ordination of f. Malinowsky

Ceremony of f. Malinowsky's ordination held in Ascension of Our Lady Church, the church of the village he was born and grow up in. The end of the ceremony. F. Malinowsky is keeping a bunch of flowers. (Priests of Ukrainian Catholic Church clothing, bunch of flowers)

Ordination of f. Malinowsky

Ceremony of f. Malinowsky's ordination held in Ascension of Our Lady Church, the church of the village he was born and grow up in. The end of the ceremony. F. Malinowsky is keeping a bunch of flowers. (Priests of Ukrainian Catholic Church clothing, bunch of flowers)

Ordination of f. Malinowsky

Ceremony of f. Malinowsky's ordination held in Ascension of Our Lady Church, the church of the village he was born and grow up in. The end of the ceremony. A young girl in Ukrainian folk costume congratulates f. Malinowsky. Ritual embracing. (Priests of Ukrainian Catholic Church clothing, Ukrainian Folk costume)

Ordination of f. Malinowsky

Ceremony of f. Malinowsky's ordination held in Ascension of Our Lady Church, the church of the village he was born and grow up in. The end of the ceremony. Final photo. (Bishop clothing, clergy clothing, peasant clothing)

Ordination of f. Malinowsky

Ceremony of f. Malinowsky's ordination held in Ascension of Our Lady Church, the church of the village he was born and grow up in. The end of the ceremony. (Bishop clothing, clergy clothing)

Ordination of f. Malinowsky

Ceremony of f. Malinowsky's ordination held in Ascension of Our Lady Church, the church of the village he was born and grow up in. The end of the ceremony. Sisters Servants and members of local Ukrainian community congratulate f. Malinowsky with ordination. (Priest clothing, modern Brazilian peasants clothing, Sisters Servants clothing)

Ordination of f. Malinowsky

Ceremony of f. Malinowsky's ordination held in Ascension of Our Lady Church, the church of the village he was born and grow up in. The end of the ceremony. Final photo. (Clergy clothing)

Ordination of f. Malinowsky

Ceremony of f. Malinowsky's ordination held in Ascension of Our Lady Church, the church of the village he was born and grow up in. The end of the ceremony. Final photo. (Bishop clothing, clergy clothing, peasant clothing)

Results 1 to 20 of 158