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Andreiv Choma Ukrainians in Brazil collection

  • CA BMUFA 0078
  • Collection
  • 2013-2015

The collection consists of field materials collected by Andreiv Choma, a master student in the Ukrainian Folklore program at the University of Alberta, during 2013-2015. The material was collected among Ukrainian communities in Brazil. It includes audio interviews with the members of Ukrainian Brazilian community, photographs (both historical and modern), copies of the wedding registry of Ukrainians in Mallet in 1907-1915, baptismal registry, handwritten papers of the Ukrainian Catholic Centre in Mallet, of the society "Ukrains'ka hromada", and other records. It also includes Andreiv's manuscript of the part of his master thesis (mostly in English, parts in Portuguese).

Choma, Andreiv

Andrew Mazurenko family collection

  • CA BMUFA 0077
  • Collection
  • 1939-1993

The collection consists of memoirs of Andrew Mazurenko, and his family photographs. Andrew wrote these in 1973 when he was 83. The memoirs tell about his roots, his life back in the Old country, his journey to Canada, and early years in Canada.

The photographs include images of him and his wife Maria, their house, homestead, and the old thatched roof house in the Old Country where Maria was born.

Mazurenko family

Andriy Nahachewsky Brazil collection

  • CA BMUFA 0045
  • Collection
  • 2009-2010

Andriy Nahachewsky travelled to Brazil for 6 months (Nov 2009 – May 2010), and worked intensively to document the traditional culture of the Ukrainian community there (some 400,000 people, rural and urban). He visited some 40 communities with a significant Ukrainian population in the states of Parana, Sao Paulo and Santa Catarina. He recorded over 250 interviews, took approximately 12,000 photographs and recorded 53 hours of video recordings. He collected a small number of artifacts of traditional life, and amassed a library of approximately 200 books (either hard copy or electronically as pdf). Research methods included audience/participation, unstructured, and semi-structured interviews, as well as work in personal and institutional archives.

Since this was the first substantial ethnographic/folkloristic documentation of this community, Andriy cast the project’s mandate quite broadly, collecting diachronic and synchronic information on material culture (farming practices, foodlore, traditional crafts, folk architecture, religious painting), as well as oral traditions (dialectal speech, songs, legends, personal experience narratives), customary lore (particularly weddings, Christmas, Easter and other calendar holidays), spiritual culture (formal religion as well as folk beliefs, folk medicine, etc), performing arts (music and dance) and local history. In all cases, he was interested in continuity from the European heritage, but also particularly in hybridity and change in the community’s traditions.

The main goal of the project was to collect materials to write a book comparing Ukrainian traditional culture on three continents. People from western Ukraine emigrated to both Canada and Brazil from the same villages (mostly from the province of Galicia in what was then the Austro-Hungarian Empire), at the same time (largest wave of migration from 1891 until 1914), and for the same reasons (scarcity of farmland in Galicia, while Canada and Brazil were both hoping to settle newly opened agricultural territories quickly).

The traditions of the community in Brazil are rich and conceptually interesting. They are similar to Canadian traditions in many ways, but also quite different. The data raise numerous issues in ethnic symbolism, cultural continuity, and the relationship between traditions and their environment. Key strengths in the data relate to wedding traditions, personal history narratives, ethnic dance traditions, religious art, and calendar customs. There is good new information on regional diversity within the Ukrainian communities in Brazil.

Nahachewsky, Andriy

Andriy Nahachewsky ethnographic collection

  • CA BMUFA 0135
  • Collection
  • 1982

The collection consists of various course assignments submitted by Andriy when he was a master and PhD student in the Ukrainian Folklore Program at the University of Alberta. The assignments cover different topics of Ukrainian and Ukrainian Canadian traditional culture and folklore, and include field recordings as well as final essays.

Nahachewsky, Andriy

Anna Biscoe ethnographic collection

  • CA BMUFA 0109
  • Collection
  • 1979

This collection includes wedding songs, winter cycle songs, and various other songs sung by Maria Mazuryk.

Biscoe, Anna

Anna Drepko collection

  • CA BMUFA 0041
  • Collection
  • 1950s-1990s

The collection consists of pillow covers and a wall hanging embroidered by Anna Drepko, Maria's mother, and memorial cards collected by her at various funerals in Winnipeg and area.

Drepko, Anna

Anna-Marie Kryschuk ethnographic collection

  • CA BMUFA 0056
  • Collection
  • 1977

The collection consists of field materials collected by Anna-Marie Kryschuk as part of her assignments for the folklore courses she took at the University of Alberta. It includes collected folk remedies, and folk songs performed during vinkopletennia (wreath weaving ritual).

Kryschuk, Anna-Marie

Ashley Halko-Addley fieldwork collection

  • CA BMUFA 0228
  • Collection
  • approximately 2018-2019

This collection consists of materials collected by Ashley Halko-Addley for her graduate research project, Waxing Away Illness, at the University of Alberta. In 2018, Ashley conducted interviews and observations of the wax ceremony in Saskatchewan and Alberta. This collection consists primarily of transcripts, audio recordings, and fieldnotes, with select supplementary materials.

A supplementary website was created by Ashley Halko-Addley. The website highlights some of the participants and important selections from their interviews. The website can be accessed here: https://sites.google.com/ualberta.ca/waxingawayillness/

Halko-Addley, Ashley

Boris Radio ethnographic collection

  • CA BMUFA 0076
  • Collection
  • 1979

The collection consists of folk songs recorded during December 1979 for the UKR-422 Ukrainian Folklore course at the University of Alberta. It includes texts of 21 songs collected by Boris Radio from Mrs. T. Gural, Mrs. N. Radio, and Mrs. Hulewich, their biographical information. In addition to transcripts of the songs, Boris translated them. The audio cassette contains recording of the songs and histories of interviewees.

Radio, Boris

Canadian Ukrainian dance competitions project

  • CA BMUFA 0028
  • Collection
  • 1996-2002

This project was the core fieldwork collection phase of Jason Golinowski's master thesis.

A dozen or more dance competitions are organized in western Canada which include or focus exclusively on Ukrainian dance, with an estimated total of some 8000 entries per year in recent years. The number of competitions and competitors has risen significantly in the past five years. This increase in popularity raises numerous questions regarding the functioning of "ethnic" cultural activities in this country. Various theories explaining "ethnic persistence" and "ethnic revival" have been proposed. The present project is designed to develop an empirical base of data to test aspects of these conceptual models.

The project consists of asking competition organizers for competition programs and marks through their histories, information which is quite readily available to these committees. A detailed database of the competitors, their home group, instructors, their marks and placements, adjudicators, repertoire and other information will allow an analysis of behavior trends that will shed light into the functions of the competitions and the motivations of the various categories of participants.

This project is relatively self-contained and has been proposed as a Master's thesis by Jason Golinowski in the Ukrainian Folklore Program in the Department of Modern Languages and Comparative Studies. It is also connected to a larger study conducted by Dr. Andriy Nahachewsky, dealing with "new ethnicity" and Canadian Ukrainian dance.
(from Project proposal)

Central and East European Studies Society of Alberta collection

  • Collection
  • 1974 - 1987

This collection consists of audio recordings and photographs. Recordings include news/talk shows, interviews conducted for CEESSA, and meetings and conference presentations from CEESSA. They cover diverse topics such as: problems in Central and Eastern European studies at the time and how universities and their departments function, immigration, politics, languages, daily life, life on the Canadian Prairies, life in Canada during WWII, CEESSA’s organization, goals, and projects.

Central and East European Studies Society of Alberta

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