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Zemlya/Nanaskomun collection

  • CA BMUFA 0080
  • Collection
  • 23 September 2012

On September 23, 2012, Myrna Kostash co-hosted an event in Edmonton called Zemlya/Nanaskomun (The land/We give thanks): A Ceremonial Exchange of Gifts, which meant to remind there there had once been a relationship between Ukrainians and Cree peoples. A collections consists of photographs of the event, and an article about the event by Myrna Kostash in the albertaviews. Andriy Nahachewsky and Lynnien Pawluk participated in the event. Andriy shared a story of his grandfather. Lynnien shared gifts with a representative of the Aboriginal community. See the article for detailed description of the event.

Kostash, Myrna

Yarema Kowalchuk folklore collection

  • CA BMUFA 0059
  • Collection
  • 1977-1981

The collection includes Yarema Kowalchuk's final essay for the course UKR-699.

Kowalchuk, Yarema

Walter Garbera folklore collection

  • CA BMUFA 0073
  • Collection
  • 1986

This collection contains a book review and an essay on Ukrainian mixed marriages written by Walter Garbera for his Ukrainian courses.

Garbera, Walter

Wadym Dobrolige art collection

  • CA BMUFA 0244
  • Collection
  • 1940s-1950s(?)

This collection consists of five oil paintings by Wadym Dobrolige.

Dobrolige, Wadym

Volodymyr Plaviuk proverbs collection

  • CA BMUFA 0237
  • Collection
  • 1908-1946

This is a typed manuscript of Ukrainian proverbs compiled by Volodymyr Plaviuk (Vladimir Plawiuk). Many have handwritten notes next to them, corrections, or translations.

Plaviuk, Volodymyr

Vivian Osachuk folklore collection

  • CA BMUFA 0104
  • Collection
  • 1984

This collections includes an essay by Vivian Osachuk on the development of the contemporary bandura scene for the course Ukrainian Arts in Canada.

Osachuk, Vivian

Viter Ukrainian folk choir field project collection

  • CA BMUFA 0023
  • Collection
  • 2014

The Viter Ukrainian Folk Group Choir was a large group project, supported by KuFC equipment and logistics. Graduate students from the Fall 2014 Folklore Research Methods class (MLCS) taught by Andriy Nahachewsky attended a number of rehearsals and performances by the Viter Ukrainian Folk Choir of Edmonton. Students gained experience using recording equipment, conducting interviews and then published their findings. They produced two short videos documenting the choir on stage and as a community.

Students: Nataliya Bezborodova, Larisa Cheladyn, Kateryna Kod, Kelci Mohr, Deepak Paramashivan, Allison Sokil and Dana Wylie.

Aside from two films, there are many photographs in the collection.

Verkhovyna Vocal Ensemble collection

  • CA BMUFA 0086
  • Collection
  • 1952-1995

The collection consists of organizational documents of the Verkhovyna ensemble, correspondence, photographs, concert programs, brochures, and press clippings.

Verkhovyna Vocal Ensemble

Ukrainian proverbs in Zabava Program collection

  • CA BMUFA 0037
  • Collection
  • 2011-2016

The collection consists of the audio recordings of proverbs recorded by Jason Golinowski with Andriy Nahachewsky for the Zabava program on the 840 CFCW.

Nahachewsky, Andriy

Ukrainian paganism field project

  • CA BMUFA 0025
  • Collection
  • 2006-2011

The collection consists of field research materials collected by Mariya Lesiv as part of her research during doctorate studies at the Ukrainian Folklore Program, University of Alberta, and a copy of her dissertation entitled "Modern Paganism between east and west: construction of an alternative national identity in Ukraine and the Ukrainian diaspora." 15 mini-DVs contain field video, 10 CDs - photographs, documenting rituals and interviews with Pagans in both Ukraine and North America.

Dissertation abstract:

Modern Ukrainian Paganism is a new religious movement that draws upon beliefs and practices from over a thousand years ago. It represents a mode of resistance to both the political oppression of Ukraine and the dominant position of Christianity in that country. Paganism spread among the urban Ukrainian intelligentsia in the North American diaspora after World War II, and developed actively in Ukraine after the collapse of the Soviet Union. Today, while experiencing a great decline in the diaspora, it is rapidly growing in Ukraine, involving many different Pagan communities and thousands of believers.

Pagans draw on a variety of sources including both historical chronicles containing information about old Slavic mythology and contemporary rural folklore that is believed to maintain remnants of the old pagan worldview. Although many folkloric forms have been appropriated by the Christian church, contemporary Pagans consider these elements to have originated in pre-Christian times and reclaim them for their own needs.

This work is the first extended study of Ukrainian Paganism in its post-Soviet East European context and in the North American diaspora, simultaneously comparing it with Western Paganism. It is based on ethnographic fieldwork, including participant observation of rituals and interviews with Pagans in both Ukraine and North America, as well as on archival and published materials.

While focusing predominantly on the revival of pagan folklore within this movement, this thesis demonstrates how the imagined past has become important for constructing an alternative national identity in modern contexts of socio-political turmoil. The thesis suggests that this cultural revival often has little to do with historical reality, since there is limited primary information available. Like other revivals, it involves the construction of new cultural forms through creative interpretations of the ancestral past. Moreover, the obscurity of the past allows individualistic interpretations that result in many variations of similar forms. These forms are examined in their relationship to the concepts of nationalism, gender, charisma and power, religious syncretism, and aesthetics. This work is multidisciplinary in nature as it draws upon theoretical frameworks developed in fields of folkloristics, anthropology, sociology, cultural studies and art criticism. It contributes to the understanding of modern cultural processes that shape the national consciousness of people in various parts of the world.

Lesiv, Mariya

Ukrainian dance in Canada 1930s-1970s collection

  • CA BMUFA 0064
  • Collection
  • 2014

The collection consists of the interview conducted by Larisa Cheladyn with Nadia Korpus in Calgary, and her final essay based on her research and this interview entitled "Through the eyes of Nadia Korpus: A snap shot of Ukrainian dance in Canada from the 1930s to 1970s." The essay examines Ukrainian dance in Canada from 1930s to 1970s as seen through the eyes of one person. It starts in Regina, SK, where Nadia began Ukrainian dancing as a small girl, and then criss-crossed the country as she participated in various summer programs and seminars, taught and created Ukrainian dances and formed her own Ukrainian dance group in Calgary "Rusalka". Ukrainian identity, involvement in the Ukrainian National Federation (UNF), Ukrainian Women's Organization, Summer School "Kursy" in Winnipeg are also discussed.

Sembaliuk Cheladyn, Larisa

Ukrainian community in Wroclaw collection

  • CA BMUFA 0039
  • Collection
  • 2016

The collection consists of the photographs by Andriy Nahachewsky taken while in Wroclaw in the summer of 2016; music scores and publications collected at the Holy Cross Ukrainian Catholic church. There is a large Ukrainian community in this big city, which became part of Poland after WW2, and to which Ukrainians voluntarily and involuntarily moved as Poland Polonized Silesia (and de-Ukrainianized Lemkivshchyna, Chelm, Przemysl). The church is a huge cathedral. It is historically important and is a tourist destination.

The photographs depict the cathedral (Українська католицька катедра Воздвиження Чесного Хреста), Prawoslawna Parafia sw. Archaniola Michala (Orthodox Slavic Church), Ukrainian restaurants in Wroclaw, a graffito of Ukrainian trident.

Music scores are handwritten, typed or copied notation of the music sung by the cathedral choir, including church music, carols, Holodomor concert, etc.

The publications include one issue of the monthly periodical of the Ukrainian Greek-Catholic Church in Poland "Blahovist" (Благовіст), one issue of "Khrystyians'kyi holos" (Християнський голос) - a Ukrainian religious newspaper published in Munich, and an issue of the newspaper "Nash vybir" (Наш вибір) - a newspaper for Ukrainians in Poland. There is a brochure of the Prawoslawna Parafia sw. Archaniola Michala (Orthodox Slavic Church).

Nahachewsky, Andriy

Ukrainian Pioneers Association of Alberta collection

  • CA BMUFA 0042
  • Collection
  • 1941-1997

The collection consists of the Certificate of Incorporation (1941), history of the organization in Ukrainian and English, meetings agenda and minutes, correspondence between UPAA and various people in Ukraine, project reports and documentation (includes two publication projects: Svarich Memoirs and Plawiuk's Ukrainian Proverbs), photographs and a ledger.

Ukrainian Pioneers Association of Alberta

Ukrainian Canadian Plays collection

  • CA BMUFA 0229
  • Collection
  • 1926

The collection consists of two notebooks with handwritten Ukrainian plays, as well as some music scores. One notebook has a script of a comedy play titled "Лікар крутар або поневолі лікарем: комедія на 3 дії. По сюжету Молієра перелицював М. Стрільчик"; and another comedy play script titled "Розбиті надії: комедія в 5 діях зі співами, хорами і танцями - Гр. Ів. Грушевського". The second notebook (written down in Edmonton) includes a drama play script titled "Крівава відплата ляхам: драма в 4 діях. Написав Степан Субала, У.С.С."; and a comedy play script "Канадийський редактор: комедія в двох діях. На тлі новелі Марка Твейна написав Г. Тиммора. Переклад Я. Бубнюка."

Stril'chyk, M.

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