Ukraine

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Ukraine

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Ukraine

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Ukraine

8 Archival description results for Ukraine

8 results directly related Exclude narrower terms

Band Music

This item contains two interviews with unknown females. The first interviewee was born in Russia in 1909. She talks about the place where she lived and family members that were starving and being deported to Siberia. She then talks about coming to Canada and what she and her husband did in Canada. She talks about the church and being Lutheran and Evangelic.

The second interviewee's parents came from Poland and she was raised in a Lutheran family. Her family left to Ukraine and then came to Canada in 1927 and moved to Alberta in 1928.

The tape also contains music recordings

Folklore assignment

The project consists of songs and verses collected in Edmonton from the informants Joe Olinyk, Anna Olinyk, Mrs. Helena Pinkyj, Mrs. Eva Kurylo, Mrs. Maria Stratychuk, Mrs. Annie Kapach, and Mrs. Mary Lagoski, some of whom grew up in Galicia or Bukovina and immigrated to Canada.

Honchar photograph collection

  • CA BMUFA 0006
  • Collection
  • end of 1950s - 1993

The collection consists of three albums of photographs many of which were included in the historical and ethnographic albums "Ivan Honchar: Ukraine and Ukrainians".

Honchar, Ivan

Interview with Mr. Eugene Weber and Mr. Rodolph Sommer

This item contains two recordings of interviews conducted in the summer of 1982 in Edmonton, AB. The first interview was conducted in English with Eugene Weber. Mr. Weber was born in Scott, SK in 1932 and the interview discusses the history of his family before and after his birth, and the importance of German community.

The second interview was conducted with Mr. and Mrs. Sommer in Polish, German and English. In the interview, they discuss Mr. Sommer's history of being born in Rivne (Volyn), where his mother also born. His grandfather worked as a basket maker, his father was a farmer in Volyn (Poland). The name of the village was [Maschk]. The father of Mrs. Sommer died after the WW1 and she grew up in another family. In the year 1914, when the WW1 started, Russians took all Germans from Volyn to Siberia. In the year 1916, at the age of 19 he was taken from Siberia to the Russian army. He had to fight at the Russo-Turkish war. In the year 1918, he came from the war to Kostanay after serving in the Russian army. In 1921 he came back to Volyn. His wife and him grew up in the same village and got married in 1923, first lived at her uncle´s place. His older brother lived in Canada and helped his brothers move there too. They came to Canada in June 1929. They came from Maschk to Rivne by train, came to Halifax from Danzig by ship. After they took the train to Edmonton and New Sarepta. After the arrival they stayed at the immigration camp. At the time of immigration they already had three children (born in 1924, 1926 and in 1928). Later they had one more baby (daughter) in Canada.

Weber, Eugene

Interview with Mrs. Emma Gauss, a German from Russia

This item contains an interview with Mrs. Gauss, who was born in 1898, her maiden name was Zeider (Cyder?). Her mother originally
came from Württemberg. Her family was working on the land, were not rich. There were the only Germans in their village besides one shepherd. There was also a Lutheran church and a German school (education lasted 7 years). Children started going to school when they became seven years old. At the age of fifteen there usually was a confirmation and then they were working for their father until they got married and created own family. Her village was in the Melitopol district and there was a school in Eichenfeld. In general there were 32 family entities in the village each of them were farming and producing goods. Collectivization started in 1917-1918. The relationship with Russian people was good. There usually were many seasonal Russian workers in the German village. German children learned German and Russian languages in the school. Most of the Russian language they learned from Russian workers. Not many girls extended their school education as mothers needed them at home for help. There were eight children in her family, some families had ten, some six. Russians usually were very poor, had many children and not much land. Pomeschiki had more land. Mrs Gauss remembers how people once all together bought land from pomeschik and created a village. Germans were forced to go to the Russian army as well. Tsar Nicolai was loved by Germans. There was a school which educated doctors as well. She was 16 years old when the war started, Germans were forced to join the Russian army, many were captured in Germany and afterwards returned back to Russia. Her village didn´t have problems during the war, they had a cooperative and the living was good. She visited Krym once many years later. Memories on her village during the revolution. People came from Moscow, took what they wanted and went further to other villages.

Gauss, Emma

Myeong Jae Lee photograph collection

  • CA BMUFA 0120
  • Collection
  • 2006

The collection consists of photographs of Ukraine and its people taken by Myeong Lee in 2006 in Ukraine. The images depict calendar customs, rituals, and everyday life of Ukrainians.

Lee, Myeong Jae

Natalie Kononenko Central Ukraine fieldwork collection

  • CA BMUFA 0060
  • Collection
  • 2001-2005

The collection consists of fieldwork materials collected by Natalie Kononeko during her trips to numerous villages in Central Ukraine in 2001-2005. Interviews cover a wide range of folklore topics including ritual and belief, births, weddings, funerals, songs and stories, and more.

Kononenko, Natalie

Porayko-Kyforuk family collection

  • CA BMUFA 0002
  • Collection
  • 1895-1980s

Collection consists of correspondence, memoirs, diaries, school reports, financial documents, photographs, research notes of Sophia Kyforuk and Octavia Hall.

Kyforuk family